Planning Your Next Crafting Project

by onepaperstreet

Every new project or design stems from an idea or some sort of inspiration. If you’re looking for ways to be inspired, I recommend the post: What inspires you?

When reading this post, let’s assume that you have found your source of inspiration, and are trying to figure out how to get started on your latest project. Crafting project planning doesn’t have to be complicated. Whether you are trying something new, or you are a seasoned veteran, the steps to get started are relatively similar.

 

Do your research.

While this step is valuable no matter how experienced you are, it will greatly impact a new crafter. Once you’ve decided you are ready to take on a new project, start thinking about how you will achieve the desired result, and what steps need to be taken. If you are creating a piece of jewelry, how should the beads be strung together? If staining a new table, how will the paint react to the wooden surface? What steps need to be completed first? What best practices do you need to know? Many times you’ll find that you can run a Google search to pull up YouTube tutorials and how-to articles on the web.

 

Create a blueprint.

Once you’ve done the research on what considerations need to be made, create a drawing of your project. Depending on its complexity, this can range from a simple sketch with measurements on paper to computer software that will provide a complete digital breakdown of your project.

 

Thank You Vines Digital Design

It’s important to make a visual that includes measurements when because it allows you to catch some of the project’s potential limitations and identify things you may want to change. It also allows you the opportunity to decide the quantity of materials you will need to complete the project. Depending on the size of your table, you may need one can of stain or three.

I mock up an example of every card I make. I do sometimes decide to change the initial design after I start the work, but I start with a much clearer picture of what I’m trying to achieve when using a visual during my crafting project planning.

 

Halloween Card Making Sketch

 

Choose your materials.

I always recommend taking inventory of what you already own before purchasing additional materials. Can you use what you have? Is it essential that you buy something new? Only you can answer that.

Once you know what you have and what is still needed, take a look online or in stores to see what brands you should purchase and to understand their price points. Keep your experience level in mind when doing this. Are you a novice, who is simply trying something new? If so, you probably don’t need the most expensive supplies, and can likely stick with the basics. If you’re planning to sell your work or are planning to hold onto it for a very long time, it may benefit you to invest in higher quality materials.

For more tips on purchasing materials on a budget, visit the post:  How To Use What You Already Own

 

Test your theories.

I typically find that once I buy my materials there are still some unknown variables. Let’s stick with the example of staining a table. Say you purchased the stain you thought you wanted, dove right in and just started working only to realize that the color is too dark. Your only options now are to try to sand out/remove the stain or just keep the darker color and finish table.

Now, instead of picking just one color and beginning; say you purchase a few colors, take them home, flip the table over and paint a few small swipes in places that won’t show when the table’s upright. You then pick your favorite color from that test and begin the project. These types of tests prior to starting will allow you to get as close to the initial design as you can and increase the likelihood that you enjoy the final product more.

 

Once you’ve completed your crafting project planning using the steps above, the only thing left is to begin the creation process and enjoy! Please let me know how your project turns out by leaving a comment below.

 

ALL OPINIONS AND EDITORIAL DECISIONS ARE MY OWN. THIS ARTICLE IS NOT SPONSORED.

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